Turns out, size does matter...

At least when we're talking about grinding coffee.  Often our guests remark that their coffee at home isn't as good as what we brew and serve in our shops.  A few questions reveal deficiencies in grinding.  For purposes of this conversation, I'm talking about manual brewing (Chemex, V60, Kalita Wave).  Perhaps the biggest influence on brewing is grind particulate.  The most common mistake the home brewer makes is grinding too fine.  It's pretty intuitive right?  A finer grind creates more surface area.  You're also tempted to use less coffee, but you should get lots of flavor, right?  Nope.  The result is over extraction and that's no good.  Yeah, you want the water and coffee to spend some time together not just have a fleeting romance.  The perfect grind size will do that by slowing down the water a bit.  Just like other bad relationships, spending too much time together yields bitterness.  Too big and you get the sour flavors of under extraction.  So what do you do?  You futz around with it the same as us.  Like almost everything else in our lives worth something, a little investment enriches us with results.  It's pretty simple.  The entire brewing process should take about four minutes.  I said about.  Don't get too obsessed with that, but it's definitely an indicator of proper brewing. Taste (yours) is the best indicator of proper brewing.  You should enjoy the taste of the coffee.   If you think everything else is correct but brew time takes 2 minutes then yes, grind a little finer.  If brew time takes 8 minutes, then more coarsely.  We dial in espresso brewing in our shops just like this every morning before we open and several times a day, taking note of changes then making subtle adjustments on the grinder.   If after doing this, you still aren't enjoying the coffee, select another one of our coffees from a different origin.  Coffee grown in different origins and perhaps a different cultivar will taste different...that's a conversation for another day.  Be great!